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Warren Wilson College study away courses include fifteen weeks of on-campus coursework, class meetings and orientation sessions prior to travel. Course work in-country fits into students’ summer or winter break schedules with travel for two to four weeks. Students may continue to travel after the course is complete but are required to return to campus the semester following travel to complete assignments, reflect on their experiences and share their observations and stories with the community. All courses are 4 credits.

The costs of tuition, lodging, local transportation and most meals are covered by program fees and financial support from the College. Students are expected to pay for the following additional expenses: airfare, fees for passports, visas, tourist cards or other necessary documents; medical expenses (eg, inoculations) and medicines; tips; laundry; telephone calls; postage; gifts; fees for non-required activities or excursions; and an occasional meal.

Qualification is based on sufficient accumulated credit hours, a minimum 2.5 GPA at the time of application, residency, good standing in all areas of campus and academic life, your acceptance of program policies, and any course prerequisites.

To apply for programs: click the "search and apply for a program" at the left. This will bring you to our program database and application portal. From within the program database, click "list all" and search for the program you hope to apply to, or click "advanced search" and type in the program's information. Once you have found the program and clicked on the link, you will see an "apply now" tab on the right side of the page.

Upcoming 2022-23 Courses

Cuba: Social Justice and Sacrifice: Expressions of Resiliency in Cuba

Credits: 4(SWK 3779) Fall semester course with January travel in Cuba for two weeks
Instructors: Lucy Lawrence (professor of social work) & Melissa Davis (Warren Wilson College writer)
Travel Dates: TBD

Through the distinct and interconnected lenses of social justice and self-expression, students examine myriad and interdependent social, environmental, political, economic, and cultural issues in Cuba, from both historical and contemporary perspectives. They develop an intercultural understanding of resiliency and approaches to social justice, and they examine ways in which Cuba has developed policies, programs, and practices that create a safety net to address current societal issues.

Application Fee: $75.00
Course Fee: $2,300* + airfare (est. $900-$1,200)
*(Limited amounts of need-based financial aid available)
GPA Requirement: 2.5 minimum
Application Deadline: March 25, 2022

Germany: Poets & Dictators: Philosophy, Art, and Politics in Modern Germany

Credits: 4 (PHL 3XXX) Spring semester course with May travel in Germany for two weeks
Instructors: Jay Miller (professor of philosophy) & Brian Conlan (Library Director)
Travel Dates: TBD

This course will be an immersive experience that will provide students with a rich understanding of the major cultural and intellectual developments of modern Germany. We will begin our sojourn with the art, politics, and philosophy of the nineteenth century and trace the growing tensions among these through the rise and fall of Nazi Germany. Coupling in-depth analysis of key texts with on-site experience of the modern urban center of Berlin (with day trips to Weimar and Dessau), we will focus critical attention on the collision between artistic culture and political dictatorship that defines modern Germany.

Application Fee: $75.00
Course Fee: $1,700* + airfare (est. $800-$1,200)
*(Limited amounts of need-based financial aid available)
GPA Requirement: 2.5 minimum
Application Deadline: October 7th, 2022

Indonesia & Singapore: Fields, Markets, & Kitchens: Gender & Food in Singapore and Indonesia

Credits: 4 (ANT 3XXX) Spring semester course with May/June travel in Singapore and Indonesia for three weeks
Instructors: Siti Kusujiarti (professor of anthropology) & Matt Hoffman (professor of religion)
Travel Dates: TBD

This exploratory, innovative course sits at the intersection of two important aspects of daily life: gender and food. Join Siti Kusujiarti and Matt Hoffman as we explore society, culture, food systems and gender dynamics in Singapore and Indonesia. Our time in Singapore will center around the creation of and co-existence of communities and culture through food, religion, gender dynamics, and street food cultures. In Indonesia, we will explore the unique cultural and social environment of Yogyakarta, a city known for education, religious pluralism, and varied approaches to understanding gender. Yogya sits at an interesting crossroad defining and reimagining Javanese food connected to gender, religious, and agricultural identities. In addition to touring various sites in both countries, students will have the opportunity to build deep connections with locals through homestays and service-learning opportunities.

Application Fee: $75.00
Course Fee: $1,900* + airfare (est. $1,000-$1,300)
*(Limited amounts of need-based financial aid available)
GPA Requirement: 2.5 minimum
Application Deadline: October 7th, 2022

Netherlands: Growing Resilience: Care Farming

Credits: 4 (SWK 3XXX) Spring semester course with May travel in the Netherlands for two weeks
Instructors: Sarah Himmelheber (professor of social work) & Alisha Strater (garden manager)
Travel Dates: May 15th - 29th

Students will develop an understanding of the principles and practices of care farming, with special attention to the development of this modality as a treatment approach with multiple populations including older adults, people with SPMIs, people with ID/DD diagnoses, people coping with addiction, among others. During the campus-based portion of this course, students will also visit multiple facilities in the region that utilize interaction with plants and animals as therapeutic interventions. Students will draw critical comparisons between domestic provision of services for their target populations.

Application Fee: $75.00
Course Fee: $1,700* + airfare (est. $800-$1,000)
*(Limited amounts of need-based financial aid available)
GPA Requirement: 2.5 minimum
Application Deadline: October 7th, 2022

Current 2021-22 Courses

Mexico: Rights, Revolution, and Ruins 

Credits: 2(GBL 3XX) Term 4 course with May travel in Mexico for two weeks
Instructors: Jay Lively (Integrated Advising Coach) and Paul Bobbitt (Associate Dean of Work)
Travel Dates: May 9th-May 21st, 2022

 This course will take a look at Mexico through the lens of human rights and how the past influences present-day life for Mexicans, both in relation to United States Foreign Policy as well as Mexico’s own internal policies, politics and culture. From the bustling streets and museums of Mexico City, to the beautiful colonial town of San Cristobal de las Casas in the southern state of Chiapas, students will better understand the power dynamics of one of the world’s largest cities and the impact that globalization and policy have had for some of North America’s most marginalized and isolated communities. 

Students will begin the study away portion of the course by attending language school in San Cristobal de las Casas for one week, while also participating in homestays with local families. Students will spend the first half of each day in one-on-one language classes with native speakers, and the second half of each day learning about local indiegnous issues, exploring San Cristobal, and visiting nearby villages and cooperative projects. Speaking engagements will include a closer look at the history of the 1995 Zapatista Rebellion, present-day popular resistance movements, small business owners, and local religious leaders. Students will also learn about local migration and immigration issues, trade and the economy, and how US-Mexican Foreign Policy is impacting the everyday lives of Mexicans, specifically those in Chiapas. 

Following five days of language school and homestays, students will spend three days exploring ancient Mayan ruins and visiting rural campesino communities. Through a partnership with Chiapas-based NGO Las Abejas de Acteal, students will hear from local leaders and organizations about structural injustices that exist in Mexico, particularly in Chiapas. Students will spend time exploring the ruins of ancient Mayan cities and learn what role traditional Mayan customs still play in today’s indigenous communities. Students will also explore the natural habitat of the area, including two waterfalls, the Lacandon jungle, and a small “eco-hotel,” owned by a local Mayan family. 

The group will then head back to Mexico City where we will meet with civic leaders, human rights advocates, artists and journalists during our five days in the economic center of Mexico and one of the largest and most dynamic cities in the world. Our home base and lodging while in Mexico City will be at Casa de los Amigos, a “Center for Peace and International Understanding” rooted in Quaker values. We will visit with two Warren Wilson alumni who live and have small businesses in Mexico City, as well as a small family factory that I worked with when I had my own small import-export business based in Mexico City between 2014-16. Mexican artist and educator Fransisco Coranado will join the group for a day to join us on a tour of public art projects, some inspired by the Revolution and some inspired by modern human rights struggles. 

Application Fee: $75.00
Course Fee: $1,300* + airfare (est. $500-$800)
*(Limited amounts of need-based financial aid available)
GPA Requirement: 2.5 minimum
Application Deadline: October 8th, 2021

Italy: In the Nature Studio: Ceramics in Italy

Credits: 4 (ART 3770) Spring semester course with May travel in Italy for two weeks
Instructors: Leah Leitson (professor of ceramics) & Julie Caro (professor of art history)
Travel Dates: May 9th-21st, 2022

The lure of Italy for the American artist dates back to the beginnings of our nation’s history. Although Rome was a focus for artists in the 18th and 19th centuries, more recently American artists have gravitated towards Tuscany, and they have drawn inspiration from its distinctive landscape and rich traditions of Renaissance art. Like their European counterparts, American artists have long viewed travel in Italy and first-hand experience of Italian art, architecture, and culture as an essential component of an artistic and humanistic education. In our increasingly globalized, digitized society, where images of past and present art are available 24/7, what is the value of engaging directly with a place and its cultural products and producers? This course offers students a unique opportunity to connect directly with Italy’s landscape, art, culture and people/artists through site visits, shared conversations and meals, and time to create in an Italian ceramics studio. 

Using Tuscany, Italy and Western North Carolina as our focus, this course considers what distinguishes one unique geography from another. How do cultural and artistic expressions arise from a specific geography? What are the unique aspects of a place that artists respond to and translate into material objects—its colors, textures, light, weather effects, tastes, sounds, cultural attitudes, the cadence of language, customs, jokes, folklore, etc.? We will consider our experience in relation to the experiences of artists who have travelled to Italy and make connections between the local American learning communities of Warren Wilson College, Black Mountain College, and the Penland School of Craft, all located in the rural setting of western North Carolina to the Italian learning community at La Meridiana School of Ceramics. 

While in Italy, we will spend the first week living in the Medieval hill town of Certaldo and make daily site visits to Florence, Siena, Volterra and Faenza to look at examples of ceramics, painting, sculpture, and architecture and visit the studios of contemporary artisans and artists. We will bring those experiences to bear on our studio work and independent research realized during the second week of the trip at La Meridiana School of Ceramics located just outside of Certaldo. Founded in 1982 by renowned Italian ceramic artist Pietro Elia Maddalena and set in the characteristic landscape of Tuscany, La Meridiana’s outdoor Nature Studio will allow us full access to create within the natural light, colors, and atmospheric effects of the local Tuscan landscape. On studio days in Italy, we will eat lunch at La Meridiana and experience traditional Tuscan cuisine prepared by local chef and potter Lucia and plated on pottery created by Pietro and other artists in the La Meridiana community. Days spent at La Meridiana will allow us to connect with the other artists and members of this community through informal conversations and interviews. 

In the clay studios at Warren Wilson College and at La Meridiana, students will learn or continue their study of ceramics through hand building and wheel throwing, glazing, and firing. In addition, students will learn and begin a journaling practice while on campus and continue that practice in Italy as we gather material to inspire our clay work. It is our hope that students will bring back their ideas to continue to make Italian inspired work at Warren Wilson the following year. Through studio work, readings, and independent research, students will learn to ask and answer the types of questions posed by artists and art historians as they endeavor to connect their sense of place to a new place and culture, to draw inspiration from it, and to develop their creative, intellectual, and intercultural awareness. Students will also learn some basic travel Italian. 

Application Fee: $75.00
Course Fee: $1,700* + airfare (est. $1,100-$1,400)
*(Limited amounts of need-based financial aid available)
GPA Requirement: 2.5 minimum
Application Deadline: October 8th, 2021

France: Climate Crisis in Context

Credits: 4 (ENS 3XXX) Spring semester course with May travel in France for two weeks
Instructors: Amy Knisley (professor of environmental policy & law) & Liesl Erb (professor of conservation biology)
Travel Dates: May 8th-21st, 2022

In this course, we compare the framings of and responses to climate change in the United States and France, from grassroots movements to global policy. Focusing questions include: How have responses at different scales -- local, national, international -- played out in the two countries? How has geography, e.g. urban and rural, coastal and inland, shaped residents’ reactions? How does protest culture in the two countries compare? How has climate science been perceived and used in understanding and responding to climate change? Classroom study is complemented by connections with community organizers in Asheville and Paris, climate scientists in the US and France, and nongovernmental organizations at the front lines of climate migration.

Application Fee: $75.00
Course Fee: $1,700* + airfare (est. $1,100-$1,400)
*(Limited amounts of need-based financial aid available)
GPA Requirement: 2.5 minimum
Application Deadline: October 8th, 2021